Chronic Alcohol Consumption is Inversely Associated with Insulin Resistance and Fatty Liver in Japanese Males

We aimed to elucidate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on fatty liver. We assessed the consumption of alcohol in 2429 Japanese males (mean age: 54.2 +/- 9 years); they were classified according to average consumption into non-drinkers (ND), light drinkers (LD), moderate drinkers (MD), and heavy drinkers (HD).

The prevalence of fatty liver was the lowest in the MD and highest in the ND group (p < 0.001), while obesity was not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.133). Elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were the lowest in the MD group (p = 0.011) along with resistance to insulin (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)), which was highest in the ND group (p = 0.001).

Chronic consumption of alcohol was independently and inversely associated with fatty liver and insulin resistance after adjusting for obesity, hypertension, fasting hyperglycemia, habit of drinking sweet beverages, physical activity, and age (odds ratios are as follows: ND, 1; LD, 0.682; MD, 0.771; HD, 0.840 and ND, 1; LD, 0.724; MD, 0.701; HD, 0.800, respectively).

We found that regardless of the type of alcoholic beverage, chronic consumption of alcohol is inversely associated with insulin resistance and fatty liver in Japanese males. This study had limitations, most notably the lack of investigation into diet and nutrition.

Additional Info

  • Authors:

    Akahane, T.;Namisaki, T.;Kaji, K.;Moriya, K.;Kawaratani, H.;Takaya, H.;Sawada, Y.;Shimozato, N.;Fujinaga, Y.;Furukawa, M.;Kitagawa, K.;Ozutsumi, T.;Tsuji, Y.;Kaya, D.;Ogawa, H.;Takagi, H.;Ishida, K.;Yoshiji, H.

  • Issue: Nutrients . 2020 Apr 9;12(4):1036
  • Published Date: 2020 Apr 9
  • More Information:

    For more information about this abstract, please contact
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at the Deutsche Weinakademie GmbH

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