The effect of moderate alcohol drinking in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined by fat accumulation in liver that is not caused by excessive alcohol consumption. Safe limits of alcohol consumption in NAFLD are usually defined as alcohol consumption of less than 210 g per week for men and 140 g per week for women (30 g/day in men, 20 g/day in women) and alcohol consumption below safe limits is generally regarded as moderate alcohol consumption.

Many studies have investigated the effects of moderate alcohol consumption on NAFLD patients. Some studies showed that moderate alcohol consumption prevented the progression of fibrosis in the liver, whereas other reports showed worsening of fibrosis in the liver based on serologic, radiologic and liver biopsy findings compared with effects on total abstainers.

NAFLD is also thought to be a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and when combined with excessive alcohol consumption results in the development of components of metabolic syndrome and systemic harmful effects. The effects of moderate alcohol consumption on NAFLD have yet to be established.

Additional Info

  • Authors:

    Choi, J. H.;Sohn, W.;Cho, Y. K.

  • Issue: Clin Mol Hepatol . 2020 Oct;26(4):662-669
  • Published Date: 2020 Oct
  • More Information:

    For more information about this abstract, please contact
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. at the Deutsche Weinakademie GmbH

Read 640 times

Contact us

We love your feedback. Get in touch with us.

  • Tel: +32 (0)2 230 99 70
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.